B.A. (Honours) in English & History

Code: PC411

Level: 8

Credits: 240 ECTS

Points: 300-450

Duration: 4 years

Overview

The BA (Hons) in English and History is an exciting and comprehensive four-year course of study that offers the opportunity to read the greatest works of literature in English alongside the most important and influential events in Irish, European and world history. Students on this programme develop a deep knowledge of literature in English and History, and more generally, advanced understandings of human society and culture at the local, regional and global level. The structure of the programme gives students a solid foundation in both English literature and History in years one and two, before allowing them to specialise in either English or History, or to keep a balance between the two subjects in years three and four.

The programme gives students crucial tools needed for the twenty-first century by nourishing an appreciation for critical thinking, by developing strong digital, oral and written communication skills, and by fostering the value of creativity. A further aim of the programme is to prepare graduates of the BA (Hons) in English and History for life after college by teaching them employability skills through special career skills and career practice modules. Graduates of the programme can also progress to further postgraduate study in a wide range of areas.

Structure

Year 1

Year 1 comprises 12 core modules.

Introduction to Literature

Virtues of Poetry

Toolkit for History (M)

Re-Imagining Early and Medieval Ireland (M)

Medieval Europe: Crusades, Conflict and Crises

Introduction to Drama and Theatre

Introduction to Fiction

Irish Writing 1960-1990

Debating History

Re-Imagining Ireland (1500-1700)

The Age of Exploration in the Early Modern Period 1492-1763

Academic and Digital Skills

Year 2

Year 2 comprises 12 core modules.

Critical Approaches to Literature

Theatre of the European Renaissance

Romantic Poetry

Public History and Cultural Heritage

Re-Imagining Ireland 1700-1850

Revolutions in the Transatlantic World 1763-1877

The Eighteenth-Century Novel

Contemporary Irish Writing

American Literature 1

Nation States and Global Conflict 1877-1945

Re-Imagining Ireland 1850-2000

Career Skills

Year 3

At year 3 learners take 8 core modules and 4 elective modules.

Core modules

American Literature 2

Gothic Fiction

World War One: The Fall of Empires

Ireland: Insurrection to Independence

Literature of the Victorian Age

Modernism and Modernity

The Rise of Fascism

Ireland: Politics and Society 1923-70

Elective modules

Literature and Revolution in Ireland 1890-1937/The Politics of Irish Literature 1798-1898 *

Migrations in Irish History, 1700 - present/Violence, Law and Order in Modern Irish History *

Women in Medieval Europe/ Making a living in Medieval Ireland *

Political Philosophy 1

Gender and Sexuality in Post 60s Irish Culture and Writing/ The Literature of the Troubles *

Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry

The Politics of the Great Irish Famine

Local History Project/ History, Memory and Commemoration*

Career Practice (E)

Year 4

At Year 4 all learners take the capstone Seminar and Dissertation module. The remaining modules are chosen from a wide variety of modules in Irish, British/American, and world literature, along with specialised modules in American, European Irish and medieval History.

Seminar & Dissertation

Creative Writing: Fiction

Postmodern Literature

Post-War British and American Poetry

Literature and Revolution in Ireland 1890-1937/The Politics of Irish Literature 1798-1898*

History of Antisemitism before 1933

The Troubles, From Conflict to Conciliation

Europe and the United States in the Post War World, 1945-2000

Migrations in Irish History from 1700 onwards/Violence Law and Order in Modern Irish History (E)*

Women in Medieval Europe/ Making a Living in Medieval Ireland (E)*

Modern Drama in Performance

Critical Theory: Language and Self

Gender and Sexuality in Post 60s Irish Culture and Writing/ The Literature of the Troubles*

Postcolonial Writing

Nazi Germany and the Holocaust

Irish Elections and Propaganda 1918-1937

Local History Project/ History, Memory and Commemoration*

* Cyclical modules
*Co-requisite with Postmodern Literature

Module Descriptors

Year 1

Semester 1

Skills

Academic and Digital Skills

This module develops the key academic and digital skills needed for your programme. The practical aspects of this module enables learners to explore effective learning strategies and improve their ability to use the library catalogue and digital resources to find, evaluate and use information appropriately.

Module Co-ordinator: Lisa Fortune
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

English

Introduction to Literature

This module provides learners with the ability to read literature in context. Learners are provided with a foundation for understanding the canon and canonicity, genre, form, period and literary history that they will encounter over the duration of their studies in English.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

The Virtues of Poetry: what poetry is and why it matters*

This is a foundation module that introduces learners to a wide range of poetry. The module aims to inspire confidence in learners that when they encounter poems that they will be able to read them, comprehend them, and analyse them.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

History

Toolkit for History (Introduction to Historical Enquiry 1)*

This module is designed to develop the practical skills needed to work successfully as a learner of history. By the end of the module learners should have assembled an essential 'toolkit' of skills along with the confidence to start using these tools themselves.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Medieval Europe: Crusades, Conflict and Crises

This module introduces learners to the significant events, figures and ideas that shaped the history of medieval Europe during a period of major change and expansion. It will familiarize learners with many of the themes which they will encounter in later stages of their study including state formation, tensions between church and state, European expansion, environmental challenges, poverty and inequality, and gender and society.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Re-Imagining Early and Medieval Ireland

This module introduces learners to key thematic areas through the study of early and medieval Irish history. It is an interdisciplinary module that also includes some medieval Irish literature and philosophy.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Semester 2

English

Introduction to Drama and Theatre

The objective of this module is to enable learners to develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the study of drama on stage and screen, with particular reference to the drama and theatre of Ancient Greece, and to understandings of comic and tragic drama in modern contexts.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Introduction to Fiction: Novel and the Short story*

This module aims to introduce learners to the cultural and historical contexts in which the novel and short story forms emerged and evolved. It will outline and explore a range of definitions and theories of fiction and evaluate how these concepts apply to classic texts from Russia, America, Britain, and Ireland.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Irish Writing 1960-1990

This module aims to give learners a clear sense of the key ideas, themes, and questions that have prevailed in Irish literature from mid-twentieth century to the end of the century. It will cover themes and issues such as: language and nation; the role of men and women in Irish society and the politics of gender and sexuality; the representation of family and childhood in Ireland; the role of the Catholic Church in Irish life; literary production and censorship.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

History

Debating History (Introduction to Historical Enquiry 2)

The objective of this module is to supply learners with the essential intellectual equipment to understand key debates in history. The module will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in the module Toolkit for History. It aims to offer learners an interactive learning experience, engaging them in lively debate and introducing them to the skills needed to develop their own critical understanding of the past.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Re-Imagining Ireland, 1500-1700*

This module will guide learners through the key developments in the history of Ireland in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and offer a sense of how life was lived in early modern Ireland. It locates the Irish experience within wider European and global experiences and allow the learners to reflect on the meaning and significance of economic, social, cultural, political and religious life on the island from 1500 to 1700.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard McMahon
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

The Age of Exploration in the Early Modern Period, 1492-1763

This module studies the spread of ideas across Europe and analyses how these ideas sparked exploration, and evolved into Enlightenment ideology by the late 17th century. It studies the discovery and exploration of the New World, the creation of world-wide oceanic trade routes and the environmental and economic impact of exploration and settlement in the Americas.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Year 2

Semester 1

English

Critical Approaches to Literature

This module provides learners with the knowledge, skills and competencies to identify, differentiate and evaluate a number of different critical and theoretical approaches to literary texts, the theoretical origin of these critical approaches, how to use these approaches in the evaluation and interpretation of literature, and how these critical approaches might be applied to literature in English modules and on the wider English and History programme.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Romantic Poetry: Poetic Forms and Preoccupations in British Romanticism

This module will deepen the learners' capacity to identify characteristic features of Romantic poetry. Learners will be able to identify and describe the signal characteristics of the Romantic artwork, and trace the Romantic strain in western culture thereafter.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Theatre of the European Renaissance*

The objective of this module is to help learners to develop an in-depth understanding of drama and theatre in the period of the European Renaissance, with particular reference to the development of the theatre in England, and to the plays of William Shakespeare.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

History

Public History and Cultural Heritage

This module explores the production of and consumption of history in modern society. The role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past will be considered. The concept that professional historians and the media are active agents in creating history will be evaluated, as well as those involved in community, local and family history projects.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Supervised Project

Re-Imagining Ireland, 1700-1850*

This module will guide learners through the key developments in the history of Ireland from the beginning of the eighteenth century through to the Great Famine. It will encourage learners to examine critically the major events and figures that have played a prominent part in the island's history at this time.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard McMahon
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Revolutions in the Transatlantic World, 1763-1877*

Learners on this module will examines the causes of revolutions in Europe and across the transatlantic world. Learners will analyse the competition for power in the New World, and the distribution of territories amongst old European powers.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan/Dr Eric Derr
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Semester 2

English

American Literature 1*

This module aims to develop an understanding of the relationship between American literature and the politico-economic, social, religious, and (indigenous and transatlantic) intellectual and literary contexts governing its production. Learners will study a wide range of American authors and their cultural background.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Contemporary Irish Writing*

Learners on this module examine a selection of Irish novels and short stories written or published (approximately) in the last twenty years. Learners will consider how recent Irish writing has represented and interrogated certain key cultural, socio-economic and political transformations in Ireland's recent history, including: the effects of globalisation; Irish Immigration/Emigration and its consequences; the politics of sexuality and gender; ecology, suburbanisation and the ghost estate; the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

The Eighteenth-Century Novel

This module is a survey of the early history and development of the English novel. Learners will learn about the production of literature in the eighteenth-century, the different types of fictional styles and genres of the period, how novelists responded to cultural, social, economic and political issues.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 30% Continuous Assessment; 70% Exam

History

Nation States and Global Conflict, 1877-1945*

This module covers an era that became dominated by conflicting concepts of national self-determination which sparked war and eventually led to a move in Western Europe towards unity. The module will allow learners to assess the impact of political ideologies and conflicts on society and advance the learners' understanding of the modern history of Europe and the Americas.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan/Dr Eric Derr
Assessment: 50% Continuous Assessment; 50% Exam

Re-Imagining Ireland, 1850-2000*

This module will guide learners through the key developments in the history of Ireland from the mid-nineteenth century through to the end of the twentieth century. It will locate the Irish experience within wider European and global experiences and allow the learners to reflect on the meaning and significance of economic, social, cultural, political and religious life on the island from 1850 to 2000.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Mcmahon
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Skills

Career Skills

In this workshop-based module, learners develop skills, knowledge and competencies pertinent to the future employability of graduates of English and History. Learners will hone and consolidate the following skills and competencies: Written, oral and media communication skills; Leadership, team-working and networking skills; Creative and problem-solving skills; Information technology skills and digital literacy; Information management skills; Research skills; Intercultural and sustainability skills.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 50% Continuous Assessment; 50% Project

Year 3

Semester 1

English

American Literature 2: Twentieth Century US Literature

The module aims to chart the development of US literature through seminal novels and poems and the evolution of these forms through periods of literary modernism, post-World War Two writing and postmodernism.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Gothic Fiction*

This module offers an opportunity to read classics of Gothic literature and its related forms, including horror, and to study contemporary varieties of Gothic found in popular literature and culture, urban fantasy, paranormal romance and dark fantasy.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 30% Continuous Assessment; 70% Exam

Literature and Revolution in Ireland, 1890-1937

Cyclical with The Politics of Irish Literature from 1798 to 1898 at Stages 3 and 4

This module traces the development of political, social and literary affairs in Ireland in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries (the cultural nationalist revival). It aims to develop in learners a critically-informed and imaginative response to the study of Irish affairs in this crucial period, as well as an understanding of the complex inter-relations between literature and politics that existed in these years.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 50% CA and 50% Exam

The Politics of Irish Literature from 1798 to 1898

Cyclical with Literature and Revolution in Ireland, 1890-1937 at Stages 3 and 4

This module aims to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the analysis of nineteenth century Irish writing in English. It focuses on the complex inter-relations between literature, politics, and society that existed in the period, with particular reference to the literature of the Great Irish Famine.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 100% CA

History

Ireland: Insurrection to Independence, 1891-1923*

This module asks was there an Irish revolution? If so, what kind of revolution was it? What motivated those who sought and conducted insurrections and war? What were the ramifications for nationalists, unionists, society and modern Irish politics? Alongside using secondary sources, learners will draw on newly released online archival material (including witness statements and pension records) and local and national newspapers to analyse the impact of these events on Irish society and politics.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Project

World War One: Fall of Empires*

This module aims to give learners an understanding of the course of World War One and the reasons for the downfall of four empires. It seeks to explain the political, military and social circumstances which led to defeat and revolutionary aftermath.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas McGrath
Assessment: 100% CA

Migrations in Irish History, 1700-present*

Cyclical with Violence, Law and Order in Modern Irish history at Stages 3 and 4

This module enables learners to understand the historical development and place of migration in the social and cultural life of Ireland from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard McMahon
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Exam

Violence, Law and Order in Modern Irish history*

Cyclical with Migrations in Irish History, 1700-present at Stages 3 and 4

This module will enable learners to understand the historical development and place of violence in the social and cultural life of modern Ireland. They can examine reactions to violent activity and, in particular, the part played by the courts and the law in the control of violence within both elite and popular cultures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard McMahon
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Exam

Women in Medieval Europe

Cyclical with Making a Living in Medieval Ireland at Stages 3 and 4

This module examines women's place in the political, religious, social, economic and legal history of medieval Europe. Learners will learn how women were perceived and lived in medieval society through case studies and access to a wide range of primary sources including art, artefacts and literature.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Exam

Making a Living in Medieval Ireland

Cyclical with Women in Medieval Europe at Stages 3 and 4

This module explores life in medieval Ireland from the social and economic perspective. It introduces learners to the material world of medieval Ireland and the ideas and attitudes of the people who lived there. It considers how people, both Gaelic and English, from a variety of social classes in urban and rural Ireland responded to economic and environmental challenges.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Exam

Philosophy

Political Philosophy and Secular Belief Systems 1: From City State to Contractarianism*

This module provides learners with an overview of the central issues within Political Philosophy and Secular Belief Systems through a critical survey of the major theorists in the western political tradition. The key focus of the module is to trace the development of European political philosophy from its early Greek origins through to the defining period of Social Contract theory.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Semester 2

English

Literature of the Victorian Age

Ranging across the genres of fiction, poetry, drama, and criticism this module aims to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the analysis of Victorian literature which is founded on detailed understandings of important contemporary social and political developments, and key critical contexts and debates.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 40% CA; 60% Exam

Modernism and Modernity: The Achievements of High Modernism*

This module aims to see learners to study and appreciate the achievements of major modernist authors such as James Joyce and T.S. Eliot.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 40% CA; 60% Exam

Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry*

This module aims to train learners to recognise and evaluate the characteristics of great or strong poetry through exposure to, and critical meditation upon, fine examples drawn from contemporary national and international practice. In the course learners will create a body of work that demonstrates, through modelling, a sophisticated understanding of the features of the art of poetry in our time.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 20% CA; 50% Project; 30% Exam

Gender and Sexuality in Post-60s Irish Culture and Writing

Cyclical with The Literature of the Troubles at Stages 3 and 4

This module aims to challenge learners to investigate the assumptions of their culture around gender relations and to grasp the political significance of those assumptions. It will do this by asking them to analyse post-war Irish society from horizons provided by conceptual frameworks developed in Philosophy, Sociology, and critical theory.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 40% CA; 60% Exam

The Literature of the Troubles

Cyclical with Gender and Sexuality in Post-60s Irish Culture and Writing in Stages 3 and 4

This module introduces learners to the literature of the Northern Ireland 'Troubles'. Along with reading how Northern Irish poets such as Seamus Heaney and Edna Longley responded to 'The Troubles', they will analyse and assess the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of perspectives on these writers.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 40% CA; 60% Exam

History

Ireland, Politics and Society 1923-1980*

This module will identify the core issues and debates at the heart of Irish life in this era using a variety of theoretical studies and practical research methods to analyse politics and society in Ireland. It will also examine the conflict between Church and State, women in Irish society, political divergences, class struggles, European integration and Ireland's evolving economy, as well as conflicts over health, land, religion, law and order, and welfare.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 100% CA

The Rise of Fascism*

This module examines the rise of fascism in Europe after World War One. The course aims to offer an interpretation of fascist movements and to explain why fascism was successful between the wars in Italy, Germany, Spain and other central European countries.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas McGrath
Assessment: 50% CA; 50% Exam

History: Memory and Commemoration*

Cyclical with Local History Project in Stages 3 and 4

Enable learners to engage in fruitful discussion about memory and commemoration of the past from both a theoretical and practical perspective.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 50% CA; 50% Project

Local History Project*

Cyclical with Memory and Commemoration in Stages 3 and 4

This module sets out to provide learners with a methodological approach to the research and writing of local history. It introduces learners to a wide range of archival and other sources, provides them with the skills to make appropriate use of these sources and familiarises them with research methodologies.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Murphy
Assessment: 30% CA; 70% Project

The Politics of the Great Irish Famine*

This module aims to present the history of the Famine with an emphasis on how and why politicians and others in the public sphere reacted as they did. The module seeks to explain how a tragedy of this magnitude occurred.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas McGrath
Assessment: 100% CA

Skills

Career Practice

This module aims to enhance learners' employability and transferable skills through work experience. It offers the opportunity to practice the generic employability skills already acquired and to reflect constructively and collaboratively on skills and experience developed through the work-based learning experience.


Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

Year 4

Semester 1

Common Module

Seminar and Dissertation

This is a research module that all students must take. Students produce a dissertation of 7,500 words on a topic of interest under the supervision of a lecturer. Research projects can be in English or in History or combine both disciplines.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 30% CA; 70% Project

English

Creative Writing: Fiction*

The module aims to introduce learners to different writing disciplines and styles and encourage them to experiment with them. It will also require them to develop their skills as critics through the close reading of other writers work and their own and fellow learners writing and texts.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 30% CA; 70% Project

Postmodern Literature*

The module aims to chart the formal features and recurrent themes of key postmodern texts, while also outlining the varieties of postmodern writing, including: early and late postmodern fiction, postmodern feminist fiction, postmodern (metaphysical) detective fiction, and postmodern metahistorical fiction.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 100% CA

Post War British and American Poetry: Men and Masculinities

This module affords an opportunity to study the artistic achievements of significant poets in the British and American traditions in the post-war period, and to evaluate these poets from a variety of theoretical perspectives.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 100% CA

History

Europe and the United States in the post-war world, 1945-2000*

The module examines Europe and the United States in the immediate aftermath of World War II and studies the conflicts of the Cold War from many perspectives. It analyses the emergence of European integration and concludes by considering the fall of communism and its consequences. The relationship between space, race and class across both continents will also be studied.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 50% CA and 50% Exam

'The Troubles', from Conflict to Conciliation, 1968-1998

The course examines differing political viewpoints such as those of Unionists, Nationalists, Republican, Marxists, and several others. Key events during this period will be studied such as the rise of the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA), Bloody Sunday, and Anglo-Irish peace processes and agreements. It examines the conflicting political and paramilitary ideologies and activities, and the evolution towards peace which culminated in the 1998 Good Friday agreement.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 100% CA

History of Antisemitism before 1933*

The Module examines the fate of an immigrant community in Europe within a monolithic society and indicates how a majority can be led to target a minority. It seeks to explain why a very small minority population within Europe was the object of hostility by the majority population over more than two millennia. It endeavours to understand the combination of circumstances which led to continuous long term hostility towards the Jews.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas McGrath
Assessment: 100% CA

Semester 2

Common Module

Seminar and Dissertation

This is a research module that all students must take. Students produce a dissertation of 7,500 words on a topic of interest under the supervision of a lecturer. Research projects can be in English or in History or combine both disciplines.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 30% CA; 70% Project

English

Modern Drama in Performance*

Building on the knowledge of drama and theatre that learners gained at earlier stages of the programme, the objective of this module is to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the study of a number of key works of modern drama, as well as an in-depth understanding of some of the important features and characteristics of modern dramatic performance.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 100% CA

Postcolonial Writing*

This module allows learners to read key texts from Africa, the Caribbean and South-east Asia. Learners are encouraged to think about questions of identity, race and culture, the construction of gender in a colonial context, and the relationship between literature/cultural production and empire.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 30% CA; 70% Exam

History

Irish Elections and Propaganda, 1918-1937*

This module will examine the key elections during the first few decades of independence to provide an in-depth understanding on how political parties were formed, how voting systems were created, how political parties and candidates propagandized their aims and objects, how the media influenced society and how voting patterns emerged. Contemporary writings, political speeches, propaganda campaigns and the media will be researched, along with an exploration of the historiography to analyse and interpret current understandings.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 40% CA; 60% Exam

Nazi Germany and the Holocaust*

The course aims to examine the 'world-view' of the Nazis and to provide the learner with an in-depth introduction to the key historical, social, political and military events which resulted in the physical elimination of six million European Jews during World War Two. It will also consider the fate of other disapproved of minorities such as Roma and homosexuals in the Holocaust.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas McGrath
Assessment: 50% CA; 50% Exam

Critical Theory: Language and Self: from Structuralism to Post- Structuralism and Deconstruction*

This module aims to introduce learners to the key thinkers, concepts and ideas associated with French critical and cultural theory in the second semester. It will examine the role of language theory in relation to the increased decentring of the enlightenment humanist notion of the sovereign self, leading to post-structuralist and postmodern questionings of those assumptions of self and knowledge.


Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Opportunities

Graduates of the programme have gone on to find employment in a wide range of areas such as:

  • Primary and post-primary teaching
  • Cultural institutions
  • Archives and heritage, journalism
  • Tourism
  • The civil service
  • Management
  • Marketing and advertising
  • Design
  • Media and PR
  • IT

The Career Skills and Career Practice modules have been specifically designed to enhance graduate employability by focusing on the transferable skills of Leadership, team-working and networking skills; Creative and problem-solving skills; Information technology skills and digital literacy; Information management skills; Research skills; Intercultural and sustainability skills.

*The BA (Hons) in English and History meets Teaching Council requirements for English and History. A significant proportion of graduate of the programme continue to teacher-training at primary and post-primary level, and both English and History are key subjects on the primary and post-primary curriculum.

Stories - Graduate Profiles

800

Aine O'Neill

TV Producer, Peninsula Television

Why English & History?

I choose to study English & History as I loved the variety of subjects within the disciplines. I also think the course instantly stands out on a job application. When people see English they think; well-read and good writer. When they see History they think: good at researching and an interest in detail. These are qualities that make you an attractive candidate to employers.

 

What did you enjoy most about the programme?

The lecturers offered me guidance on a daily bases, BUT for me, I found that they were flexible with me doing extra work outside of college. As I was trying to build a career in TV, it was vital to work as much as possible. This in turn meant I sometimes needed to miss a lecture or two, and the lecturers were very supportive, helping supply notes etc. This allowed me to work in the area I wanted to work in, and still keep on top of my college work.

 

How would you describe your time at Carlow College?

At Carlow College you very much feel like you’re part of something, part of a community. You get to know people on a more personal, meaningful level. You feel like the lecturers take a personal interest in each student. I never felt like I was just another number that came through the college.

 

Favourite memories of Carlow College?

The memories I made will forever make me smile. I walked into Carlow College with little education, not much confidence and no academic strengths. I skipped out with lifelong friends, a degree in English and History and the confidence to pursue the career I really wanted. I will be forever grateful to the staff and lecturers of Carlow College for that.

 

What advice would you offer to people considering to study at Carlow College?

DO IT!!! Apply and get ready to unveil your potential to the world.

 

What did you do when you graduated?

I was lucky enough to go straight into a job that I had wanted since I was a young girl. I finally had the confidence to apply and I had the education to back me up. I started working on various shows for RTE and TV3.

 

Have you worked on any exciting projects since you began working?

So many. I’ve been really lucky. I’ve worked on quite a few TV shows: entertainment, reality, observational docs, hidden camera etc… I have worked on the IFTA red carpet 4 or 5 times. I love that, I interviewed so many different people!

What are you doing now?

I am currently working as a TV Producer with Peninsula television. I am Assistant Producer on the TV show, Evidence of Evil on CBS Reality. I also run a small casting agency called O Neill Casting. I cast for plays, TV Shows, TV Adverts, Movies and other media work.

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