B.A. (Honours) in Arts & Humanities

Code: PC410

Level: 8

Credits: 240 ECTS

Points: Circa 278

Duration: 4 years

Overview

 

B.A. (Honours) in Arts and Humanities

The B.A. (Honours) in Arts and Humanities is a 4 Year Level 8 Programme. It is one of our flagship courses and gives students a valuable insight in the major ideas, events and cultural heritage that have influenced western conceptions of humanity and society. Students can choose modules from a wide range of interesting disciplines, including English, Creative Arts, Media Studies, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Theology and Teacher Placement.

 

Tailored to individual interests

The programme is designed in such a way that students can study a broad range of areas or narrow their focus to the subjects they want to pursue. Also, to help students prepare for life in college, there are special modules in first year, such as academic and digital skills.

 

Five disciplines

There are five disciplines on the programme. After first year, students can take modules from some or all these disciplines (in a variety of combinations):

  1. English, Creative Arts & Media
  2. History
  3. Philosophy
  4. Psychology
  5. Theology & Teacher Placement

 

What can you expect to learn?

The B.A. (Honours) in Arts & Humanities allows students to tailor their learning to their own interests. It equips students with the essential tools needed for the 21st century by nourishing critical thinking, developing communication skills and preparing for future choices. Students who take this course can open their mind to different ways of thinking and understanding; they become reflective thinkers who are socially engaged and appreciate learning as a lifelong activity.

 

Where can you expect to go?

Graduates of this programme find employment in many different fields such as media, marketing, tourism, banking, pastoral care and the civil service. Graduates can also go onto further postgraduate study. For students interested in teaching, the programme has primary teaching placement options for those who concentrate a portion of their studies on Theology.

Structure

Every student on the BA (Hons) in Arts and Humanities must accumulate at least 80 credits in at least one discipline area by the end of Year 4. This is known as a Major. Students who accumulate at least 80 credits in two subjects attain a Double Major. Majors are attained by accumulating credits over the four Stages of the programme, and can be attained in any discipline area. Remaining credits can be spread across other modules in other disciplines.

Year 1

You will take modules in each of the five core disciplines. Each module is worth 5 credits.

Core Subjects

English, Creative Arts and Media (10 credits)

History (10 credits)

Philosophy (10 credits)

Psychology (10 credits)

Theology (10 credits)

Common Modules

Academic and Programme skills modules (10 credits)

Year 2

You will take a minimum of 15 credits (three modules) in at least one chosen Major subject. You can choose up to 20 credits if you wish in a Major subject. The remaining credits can be distributed any way you like.

Major Subject

Minimum 15 credits

Elective Subjects

Up to 45 credits

Year 3

You will take a minimum of 20 credits (four modules) in your chosen Major subject or subjects. You can choose up to 35 credits (seven modules) if you wish in your Major(s). The remaining credits can be distributed any way you like. For students who are pursuing a Double Major, they should aim to have accumulated at least 55 credits in both subjects by the end of Stage 3.

Major Subject

Minimum 20 credits

Elective Subjects

Up to 40 credits

Stage 4

By the end of Stage 3, you will have accumulated at a minimum 45 credits in at least one subject. In Stage 4, you will make up the remainder of your credits to ensure you have attained a Major in at least one subject.

Major Subject

Minimum number of credits to reach 80 in your Major subject

Elective Subjects

Remaining credits can be spread across other subjects

Module Information

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Semester 1

Common Module

Academic and Digital Skills

This module aims to introduce learners to the expectations and conventions of a higher education learning environment and to enhance their personal effectiveness as learners. Through the development of key academic and digital skills, an independent and reflective approach to learning is encouraged which will enable the learner to manage confidently their academic coursework at degree level. The practical aspects of this module will enable learners to explore effective learning strategies and improve their ability to use the library catalogue and digital resources to find, evaluate and use information appropriately.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Morgan Buckley
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

English, Creative Arts and Media

The Virtues of Poetry: what poetry is and why it matters

This course aims to inspire confidence in learners that when they encounter poems that they will be able to read them, comprehend them, and analyse them. This course aims to inspire a love and appreciation for the art of poetry in learners, based on the knowledge that great poetry is difficult to write, and by their ability to grasp and demonstrate the multifaceted dimensions of a great poem. This course aims to produce advocates of poetry in the public and educational domain, based on their understanding of the many traditions of poetry, and through their mastery of the language used to articulate the complex combination of elements that are held in tension in great poetry.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

History

Toolkit for History (Introduction to Historical Enquiry I)

This module is designed to develop the practical skills needed to work successfully as a learner of history. By the end of the module learners should have assembled an essential ‘toolkit’ of skills along with the confidence to start using these tools themselves. They should also have an understanding of some of the issues involved in studying history as an academic discipline.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ida Milne
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy

This module will acquaint the learner with the foundations of European philosophy and emphasise its importance in the history of ideas. Its aim is to introduce the learner to some of the key thinkers of the period and situate them in the context of the progression of ideas through the key themes of the separation between appearance and reality, the development of an Increasingly sophisticated metaphysical account of the nature of things and the relationship between this emerging philosophy and existing religious beliefs. The overall emphasis will be to situate these thinkers and themes within the social, historical and cultural contexts of their time.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Psychology

Psychology 1

The overall aim of this module is to introduce the learner to the breadth and scope of psychology through the Arts and Humanities Programme. The objectives rest in situating Psychology closely with the other mandatory disciplines in order to facilitate the learner’s awareness of how this discipline ‘fits’ in their overall degree.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Candice Condon
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Theology

Introduction to Theology

This module aims to provide a working knowledge of key terms and topics in Christian theology. This provides learners with the basis to develop the theological literacy needed to take part in cultural and religious discussions and to pursue personal questions about faith and practice in contemporary culture.

Module Co-ordinator: Michael Sherman
Assessment: 20% CA & 80% Exam

Semester 2

Common Module

Arts and Humanities Seminar

The aim of this module is to help learners understand how disciplinary frameworks shape the manner in which topics and themes are addressed within a discipline; to show learners the interdisciplinary potential and possibilities of a humanities’ enquiry and to enable learners to make informed choices about the disciplines they might pursue through their degree.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anthony McGrath
Assessment: 100% CA

English, Creative Arts and Media

Introduction to Fiction: Novel and the Short story

This module aims to introduce learners to the cultural and historical contexts in which the novel and short story forms emerged and evolved. It will outline and explore a range of definitions and theories of fiction and evaluate how these concepts apply within a range of texts from Russia, America, Britain, and Ireland. Learners will develop and deepen their knowledge of literary terminology and methodologies of textual interpretation through guided and self-directed close-text analysis. A further aim of the module is to encourage learners to comprehend the function and limits of genre and generic classification.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

History

Re-Imagining Ireland, 1500-1700

This module will guide learners through the key developments in the history of Ireland in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and offer a sense of how life was lived in early modern Ireland. It will encourage learners to examine critically the major events and figures that have played a prominent part in the island’s history in this period. It seeks to locate the Irish experience within wider European and global experiences and allow the learners to reflect on the meaning and significance of economic, social, cultural, political and religious life on the island from 1500 to 1700.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard McMahon
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Philosophy

Medieval Philosophy

This module is designed as a Stage 1 introduction to Medieval philosophy. It aims is to acquaint the learner with this period of philosophy and its importance to the development of the history of ideas at this time. Of particular emphasis will be the relationship between philosophy and religion, highlighting the convergences and tensions between these two forms of thought. The module will identify the importance of the role of philosophy in the elaboration and development of, in particular, Christian thinking and set it in the context of the historical, social and religious events of the time period.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Psychology

Psychology 2

This module aims to introduce the learner to the discipline of Psychology, which is the science of mind and behaviour. It is set out in sections comprising an overview of Evolutionary Psychology, plus an introduction to Cognitive, Social, and Forensic Psychology. Learners are introduced to a wide range of issues such as attention, memory, perception, the biological basis of behaviour, the self and social cognition. Learners will also be provided with an introduction to the research methods and ethical considerations employed within psychology.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Candice Condon
Assessment: 100% CA

Theology

Theological Themes in World Literature, Cinema and Music

This module aims to enable learners to explore and identify theological themes in world literature, cinema, and music. Learners should attain the ability to reflect theologically upon the arts and evaluate implicit and explicit religious content as it pertains to the Christian economy of salvation in various art forms.

Module Co-ordinator: Michael Sherman
Assessment: 100% CA

Year 2 (60 Credits)

Semester 1

English, Creative Arts and Media

Theatre of the European Renaissance

The objective of this module is to help learners to develop an in-depth understanding of drama and theatre in the period of the European Renaissance, with particular reference to the development of the theatre in England, and to the plays of William Shakespeare.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 100% CA

Creative Writing: Poetry

This module aims to develop in learners the skillset required to analyse and appreciate the achievements of contemporary poets. More importantly, the module challenges its participants to demonstrate their belief in the art by devoting time and resources to acquiring the techniques and skills required to produce their own original body of work. In doing this, the course aims to contribute to the continuing tradition of English language poetry in Ireland.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 20% CA, 50% Portfolio & 30% Exam

History

Re-Imagining Ireland, 1700-1850

This module will guide learners through the key developments in the history of Ireland from the beginning of the eighteenth century through to the Great Famine. It will encourage learners to examine critically the major events and figures that have played a prominent part in the island’s history at this time. It seeks to locate the Irish experience within wider European and global experiences and situate this period of Irish history within debates in the Irish historiography encompassing nationalist, revisionist and post-revisionist approaches to the subject.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Revolutions in the Transatlantic World, 1763-1877

Learners on this module will examines the causes of revolutions in Europe, particularly in France, that influenced further revolutions across the transatlantic world. The module urges learners to analyse the competition for power in the New World, and the distribution of territories amongst old European powers. This module also encourages learners to explore some of the other areas that influenced war and revolution such as the evolution of print and pamphleteering, and the economic and environmental impact of slavery. Learners will study theories of revolution, and the influence of changing ideologies on politics and society, the different strands and interconnectedness of revolutions across the transatlantic world; and the development of new technologies that inspired change. This module encourages learners to examine the spread of new philosophical ideas across Europe and to investigate how these ideas sparked further exploration which evolved into Enlightenment ideology by the late 18th century.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ida Milne /Dr Eric Derr
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Philosophy

General Ethics: Guiding Rules

This module aims to introduce learners to the principles, concepts and problems of rule based ethical theories through a critical analysis of Kantian and Utilitarian moral theory. It will present learners with fundamental frameworks by which to analyse social, moral and political phenomena, as well as developing learner capacity for critical thinking.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Modern Philosophy 1600-1800: From Rationalism to the Enlightenment

The aim of this module is to provide the learner with an historical overview of the period of European Philosophy from the 1500’s-1800’s. The module centres on the theme of the emergence of the developing concept of self during this period and its impact on the way in which knowledge was understood. This emphasis on the relationship between self and knowledge will be set against the backdrop of the emergence of the idea of the primacy of reason and its increased autonomy from the constraints of dogmatic theology. Each individual philosopher’s thought will be set in the context of the development of cultural ideas of the new sciences, rationalism, empiricism and scepticism. Therefore, the intellectual and cultural movements of post-Renaissance rationalism and the Enlightenment will be understood as providing the contextual framework of philosophers’ thought

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Psychology

Child Developmental Psychology

The aim of this module is to demonstrate the development of the child from conception to early adulthood. The objectives rest in showing the learner how the child was viewed across history in the microcosm of the home and immediate family, the mesosystem of schools, church and community, and the macro system of culture, religion, economics and education.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Theresa Mulhern
Assessment: 60% CA & 40% Exam

Organisational Psychology

The aim of Organisational Psychology is to improve the learners understanding of how organisations operate and their role and function within a given organisational culture and ethos. The objectives are to introduce the learner to structural elements of organisations, organisational perspectives, communication in organisations, how to deal with organisational stress, and concepts such as leaders and followers, gender, motivation and technology in the workplace.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Ní Chuileann
Assessment: 80% CA & 20% Exam

Theology

Christology: Encountering Jesus of Nazareth

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the critical issues and theoretical frameworks for understanding how one encounters Jesus of Nazareth. It will explore contemporary debates and methods of historical enquiry as they emerge in the various quests for the historical Jesus. Special attention will be given to the parameters of an intellectually rigorous and credible discourse on the resurrection. An historical overview will focus on the early Church, the formative controversies, and their development in classical Christological discourse. Building on the Stage 1 modules (Introduction to Theology, Theological Themes in World Literature, Cinema, and Music) learners will read and critically reflect on a number of theological texts. The module will also explore representation of Jesus in film, literature, and contemporary culture.

Module Co-ordinator: Michael Sherman
Assessment: 100% CA

Biblical Studies

The aim of this module is provide the learner with an historical overview of the biblical world from Abraham to the end of the first century of the Christian era. The learner will develop a sense of the geography of the biblical lands. The module aims to help the learner bridge the gap from the ancient world to the present time and culture. The learner will have a hands-on ability to work with sections of the Bible and biblical authors, and make the learner aware of how great a role scripture plays in theology.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Semester 2

English, Creative Arts and Media

Contemporary Irish Writing

Learners on this module examine a selection of Irish novels, plays, poems and short stories written or published (approximately) in the last twenty years. Through the development of research, collaborative and presentation skills and competencies, the module aims to equip learners to consider and analyse how recent Irish writing has represented and interrogated certain key cultural, socio-economic and political transformations in Ireland’s recent history, including: the effects of globalisation; Irish Immigration/Emigration and its consequences; the politics of sexuality and gender; ecology, suburbanisation and the ghost estate; the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith & Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Drama and Performance 1

This module takes as its premise that the play text is merely a blueprint for the living art form of theatre. The module aims to introduce the principles and practice of drama and performance. Starting with basic technical exercises, it will increase the learners’ confidence and skill base in dramatic performance while at the same time giving an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of drama as a performance art.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

History

Re-Imagining Ireland, 1850-2000

This module will guide learners through the key developments in the history of Ireland from the mid-nineteenth century through to the end of the twentieth century. It will locate the Irish experience within wider European and global experiences and allow the learners to reflect on the meaning and significance of economic, social, cultural, political and religious life on the island from 1850 to 2000. It will situate modern Irish history within debates in the Irish historiography encompassing nationalist, revisionist and post-revisionist approaches to the subject.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 40% Continuous Assessment; 60% Exam

Nation States and Global Conflict, 1877-1945

This module expands on Semester 1 in a logical manner to provide progression in learning; it further encourages learners to hone research and writing skills. The module advances the learners’ understanding of the modern history of Europe and the USA and the evolution of political thought. Learners will analyse how the great powers of Europe engaged in imperial expansion and reorganisation to secure manpower, economic resources, territory and prestige in an attempt to gain primacy against their European rivals. Counterbalancing the imperial expansion and reorganisation by European powers was the emerging global influence of the United States which, by the end of the 19th century, had largely completed western expansion and started to have a more active role on the global stage. Learners will engage with how global conflict impacted nations and culminated in two world wars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ida Milne /Dr Eric Derr
Assessment: 50% Continuous Assessment; 50% Exam

Philosophy

General Ethics 2: The Good Life

This module aims to introduce learners to the principles, concepts and problems of ethical theories based on the pursuit of a well lived human life. In particular, it will examine Aristotelian Virtue Ethics and the more recent Care Ethics theories. It will present learners with fundamental frameworks by which to analyse social, moral and political phenomena, as well as developing learner capacity for critical thinking.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Modern Philosophy 1800 - 1960: From Romanticism to Existentialism

The aim of this module is to provide the learner with an historical overview of the period of European Philosophy from the 1800’s to the 1960’s. The module centres on the theme of the developing concept of self from German Romantic engagements with new concepts of knowledge. This emphasis on the relationship between self and knowledge will be set against the emerging complexities on thought about the self as the romantic period develops into early forms of existentialist thinking. Each individual philosopher’s thought will be set in the context of the development of the idea of the idealist subject to the emergence of the notion of solipsism. These overall themes will be traced through the framework of the philosophers’ thought.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Psychology

Educational Psychology

The aim of this module is to demonstrate the contribution of psychology to educational practice. The objective is to introduce the learner to research on classroom behaviour and management, pupil-teacher relationships, pupil motivation, learner readiness, individual differences and difficulties pupils may experience such as reading and writing disorders.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Teresa Mulhern
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Social Psychology

The aims of Social Psychology are to provide the learner with a deep understanding of how thoughts, feelings and behaviours can be shaped by the real or imagined presence of others. The objectives of this module are to introduce the learner to the ways we think about our social worlds, how we read and try to make sense of other people, to understand the functions of attitudes and behaviours, to recognise the effects of prejudice and discrimination and to appreciate concepts such as prosocial behaviour, aggression, conformity and obedience.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Candice Condon
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Theology

Christian Anthropology: The Human Question

The aim of this module is to explore what it means to be human through the lens of Christian theology. The module will examine the development of the doctrines of creation, grace, original sin, death, and redemption in Christian theology. The module will study in some detail the Christian anthropology that is to be found in Vatican II’s Gaudium et Spes. The theme of ‘ecological conversion’ (Laudato Si) will also be explored with a view to reflecting critically on what it means to be human in an ecologically responsible way.

Module Co-ordinator: Michael Sherman
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament

This module gives students knowledge and appreciation of the phenomenon of prophecy, its background and its various manifestations in Israel and in the Ancient Near East. Students will become familiar with the ministries of the individual prophets, their significance and their message.

Module Co-ordinator: Rev Fearghus Ó Fearghail
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Year 3 (60 Credits)

Semester 1

English, Creative Arts and Media Studies

Gothic Fiction

The aim of this module is to provide knowledge and understanding of the history of Gothic literature and its related forms, including horror, and to account for more contemporary varieties found in urban fantasy, paranormal romance and dark fantasy. The module has three particular objectives: (1) To provide for a strong knowledge of the conventions, styles and modes of the Gothic genre (2) To read Gothic literature in and through historical contexts. A key objective therefore is to build on and reinforce attained competencies of understanding and interpreting literature in context (3) To utilise digital skills to enhance collaborative learning.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 30% Continuous Assessment; 70% Exam

American Literature: Twentieth Century US Literature

The module aims to chart the development of US literature through seminal novels and poems and the evolution of these forms through periods of literary modernism, post-World War Two writing and postmodernism. It aims to understand how texts engaged with key historical contexts and political movements, including: the Civil Rights movement, the series of US wars in Europe, Vietnam and the Middle East, post-war counter cultural movements, the proliferation of neoliberal capitalism and its attendant cultural effects.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

Drama and Performance 2

The module aims to introduce the principles and practice of drama and performance. Starting with basic technical exercises, it will increase the learners’ confidence and skill base in dramatic performance while at the same time giving an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of drama as a performance art. Building on the foundation of Drama and Performance 1, it is intended to bring learners to the point where they have the understanding, skills and confidence to perform with competence in public.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

Media and Communications

The module will introduce learners to communication models and theories of both interpersonal and intercultural communication. Learners will be introduced to the major theories of mediated communication and examine the implications for democracy of mass media technologies and communications networks in contemporary society. The module facilitates learners developing their presentation skills and writing for different contexts.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ryan
Assessment: 100% CA

History

Ireland: Insurrection to Independence, 1891-1923

This module asks was there an Irish revolution? If so, what kind of revolution was it? What motivated those who sought and conducted insurrections and war? What were the ramifications for nationalists, This module asks: was there an Irish revolution? If so, what kind of revolution was it? What motivated those who sought and conducted insurrections and war? What were the ramifications for nationalists, unionists, society and modern Irish politics? Alongside using secondary sources, learners will draw on an abundance of newly released online archival material (including witness statements and pension records) and local and national newspapers (available on microfilm in the Carlow County Library) to analyse the impact of these events on Irish society and politics. Learners will examine contemporary writings, speeches and debates; and will be urged to focus on the primary source material for the study of the period in their assignments.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Project

World War One: The Fall of Empires

This module aims to give learners an understanding of the course of World War One and the reasons for the downfall of four empires. It seeks to explain the political, military and social circumstances which led to defeat and revolutionary aftermath.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Mc Grath
Assessment: 100% CA

Violence, Law and Order in Modern Irish history*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4
The module explores experiences of and attitudes to both violence and the law in modern Irish history. It will involve an examination of the extent, nature and characteristics of violent activity in Ireland and any changes which have occurred in patterns of violence over time. The focus will be on both interpersonal and collective violence and will offer learners an opportunity to engage with the varying causes and motives for violent activity in Irish society from the directly personal to the overtly political. The course will also focus on the role of the law and, in particular, its effectiveness in controlling violent activity in Irish society. Overall, the module will allow learners to garner a greater understanding of both the place and function of violence and the law in Irish society and among those who migrated from it, and to place the Irish experience within a broader international context.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 40% CA and 60% Exam

Philosophy

Political Philosophy and Secular Belief Systems 1: From City State to Contractarianism

This module aims to provide the learner with an overview of the central issues within Political Philosophy and Secular Belief Systems through a critical survey of the major theorists in the western political tradition. The key focus of the module is to trace the development of European political philosophy from its early Greek origins through to the defining period of Social Contract theory. The module will present learners with core texts, concepts and theories in political philosophy.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Existentialism: Philosophy and Literature

The aim of the module is to survey canonical philosophers and texts of twentieth-century existentialism and its major precursors. The module traces Existentialist themes (such as authenticity, freedom, anxiety, death) in later twentieth-century works of philosophy and literature. The objectives of the module are to acquire knowledge of the range of Existentialist-inflected thought in philosophy and literature; to foster an ability to synthesise the study of this key movement in continental philosophical and literary culture in an interdisciplinary way; and to learn how to identify existentialist themes in philosophy, literature and modern culture.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anthony McGrath
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Humans and Other Animals 1: Animal Being and the Continental Tradition*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

Throughout the thought of mainstream western civilisation the non-human animal has been seen as having little or no ethical significance. From ancient Greek thought through to medieval Christian theology, the idea has been reinforced that the non-human animal existed for the sake and use of the human animal. However, over the past three decades we have seen the emergence of new challenges to the traditional views of the status of the non-human animal. This first semester module is intended to investigate these new challenges in its ontological formulations based in late 20th and early 21st century continental thinking. The module will highlight the emergence of this new thinking in this tradition and the question of the animal in our time.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Psychology

Cognitive Psychology: Sensation, Perception and Memory

The overall aims of this module are to introduce the learner to how we attend to and gain information about the world, how that information is stored, and processed by the human brain, and how we solve problems, think, and formulate language. The objectives are to deepen the learners understanding of psychology and to enhance the learner’s knowledge of how to relate psychological learning with philosophers such as Chomsky and Descartes, and /or how to use psychological learning to understand or create characters in novels, films or other media.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Candice Condon
Assessment: 100% CA

Abnormal Psychology

The aim of this module is to provide the learner with an appreciation and understanding of human behaviours that impair a person’s ability to function in daily life. An objective is to introduce the learner to personality and intelligence tests, interviews, patient observations and written case studies. This module further aims to engage the learner across historical figures, characters from the Literature, Media and Arts with disorders, as well as the philosophical ethical issues surrounding the treatment of persons with these disorders.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Candice Condon
Assessment: 50% CA & 50% Exam

Community Psychology

This module will give learners an understanding of the psychological approaches utilised in community psychology research, and make them aware of the role of research in informing both theory and practice. The objective of community psychology is to optimise the well-being of communities and individuals with innovative and alternate interventions designed in collaboration with affected community members and with other related disciplines inside and outside of psychology. Throughout the course, the learner will consider the various types of research methods (experimental, correlational, etc.) and the ethical considerations employed within community psychology. Learners should develop the skills and knowledge necessary to undertake a research project. They should also be capable of reading and interpreting research reports.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Ní Chuileann
Assessment: 100% CA

Theology and Teaching Placement

Ecclesiology: Apostolic Church Today

This module aims to provide a basic knowledge of key concepts in ecclesiology while exploring the links between ecclesiology and the other theological disciplines. The module will introduce the learner to key ecclesiological themes in light of the Second Vatican Council.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dermot Ryan
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Fundamental Moral Theology

The aim of this module is to examine and explore fundamental principles of moral theology. This will be done by providing learners with an overview of key themes within the development of moral reasoning and by exploring the difference between a moral life that draws from faith and philosophical ethics. Learners will study topics including: the role of scripture in moral theology, the development of conscience, catholic social teaching, and issues of social justice.

Module Co-ordinator: Michael Sherman
Assessment: 50% CA & 50% Exam

The Synoptic Gospels

In this module, the learner will gain knowledge of the ministry of Jesus, its background and the formation of the Gospel Tradition. Learners will have an appreciation of the literary composition of the individual gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke and an awareness of the literary styles of the various writers and of the main theories on the relationship between the synoptic gospels. Learners will be attentive to the rhetorical skills of the individual gospel writers, their theological sensibilities and their individual portraits of Jesus. And, learners will have a knowledge of the date and purpose of the synoptic gospels. and their main themes.

Module Co-ordinator: Fr Fearghus Ó Fearghail
Assessment: 20% CA & 80% Exam

Catechetics and Teaching Placement 1: Primary (10 ECTS Semester 1 and 2)

This module will equip learners for the rapidly-changing 21st century workplace through a supported and supervised teaching placement. It aims to provide knowledge of Christian Religious Education for the Primary School by adhering to the child-centred aims of the 1999 primary school curriculum and the principles of Aistear, the Early Childhood Curriculum. Learners will develop a constructivist orientation to learning which is shaped by their familiarity with educational theorists.

Module Co-ordinator: Mary Dooley
Assessment: 100% CA

Semester 2

English, Creative Arts and Media Studies

Modernism and Modernity: The Achievements of High Modernism

This module aims to develop sophisticated readers of complex literature. It will achieve this objective by challenging learners to develop their ability to organise their thinking around complex literary works through the demonstration of sophisticated skills. These skills will include the capacity to synthesize the influence of economic and material arguments like those of Marx, with the psychoanalytic arguments of Freud, allied to a consideration of material conditions like the growth of urban centres and the spread of industrialization, in relation to modernist authors and their major works. This module aims to see learners appreciate the achievements of major modernist authors. Learners will illustrate their capacity to assess the insights gained from one theoretical position in relation to another, as they evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of one approach relative to the other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry

This module aims to develop practitioners of, and advocates for, the ancient art of poetry. This module aims to train learners to recognise and evaluate the characteristics of great or strong poetry through exposure to, and critical meditation upon, fine examples drawn from contemporary national and international practice. In the course learners will create a body of work that demonstrates, through modelling, a sophisticated understanding of the features of the art of poetry in our time. This course aims to have learners appraise the current state of the art of poetry, and through their own creative practice offer a contemporary validation of the art, through a creative re-visiting, re-writing, and reconstruction of its major tropes, themes, and forms through their own dynamic practice and in response to the conditions of their time.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Derek Coyle
Assessment: 20% CA; 50% Project; 30% Exam

Media Studies: Film 1

This module aims to give learners a comprehensive understanding of the cultural significance of cinema in the 20th century exploring its technological arrival and its industrial significance in the wider context of modernity and modernization.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ryan
Assessment: 100% CA

History

Ireland, Politics and Society 1923-1980

This module will identify the core issues and debates at the heart of Irish life in this era using a variety of theoretical studies and practical research methods to analyse politics and society in Ireland.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 100% CA

History: Memory and Commemoration*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

This module will examine the processes of remembering and commemorating the past. Taking a case study orientated approach, the ways in which history and commemoration have been utilised by politicians, communities, and interest groups will be explored. This will enable learners progressing into the workplace (in, for example, museums, libraries, schools, civil buildings, media and marketing) to critically assess commemorative events, plan events, and to assess memory (its benefits and pitfalls). Given the burgeoning literature on memory over the last three decades, and the current Decade of Commemorations project a key aim of this module is to reassess the state of the field and propose and contribute to new directions in the study of memory and commemoration.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Project

The Politics of the Great Irish Famine

This module aims to present the history of the Famine with an emphasis on how and why politicians and others in the public sphere reacted as they did. The module seeks to explain how a tragedy of this magnitude occurred.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

The Rise of Fascism

This module examines the rise of fascism in Europe after World War One. It aims to present learners with a grounded knowledge of Mussolini, Hitler and their respective movements. The course aims to offer an interpretation of fascistic movements and to explain why fascism was successful between the wars in Italy, Germany, Spain and other central European countries.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ida Milne
Assessment: 50% CA & 50% Exam

Philosophy

Political Philosophy and Secular Belief Systems 2: From enlightenment to Communitarianism

The key focus of the module is to trace the development of European political philosophy from the defining period of Social Contract theory and the various communitarian responses to it from Hegel to contemporary autonomous Marxism. The central theme is the articulation of philosophical thought between the various strains of organicism and of atomistic individualism. Between these two poles each thinker will be assessed in relation to their contribution to the debate of defining the relationship between state and the individual. Each philosopher will be regarded in terms of both their original contribution and where their thought is placed within the development of political philosophy in their time period.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Humans and Other Animals 2*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

This module aims to provide the learner with an overview of the central concepts, different theories and modes of analysis in the area of animal ethics. It aims to develop the learner's critical and analytic skills through the reading and analysis of core texts from the animal ethics field.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Human Rights: A Philosophical Approach

This module aims to introduce learners to the principles, concepts and problems of Human Rights theory. It develops skills of analysis, critical reflection and the ability to formulate independent arguments through close reading of primary texts and analysis of Human Rights' dilemmas.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Philosophy of Religion

This module will highlight the relationship between philosophy and religion during the period of the Enlightenment. Key figures of both periods will be used to elucidate the tensions and co-operations between these two traditions in this period. The enlightenment philosophers of religion identify the unique tensions that exist within the competing claims to truth of philosophy and religion. Emerging from the period where philosophy was regarded as the handmaiden of theology, enlightenment thinking reasserts the power of reason in matters of religion and therefore identifies the central issues of church authority, the absolute truth of revealed religion through scripture and the role of reason in elaborating a religious point of view.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anthony McGrath
Assessment: 100% CA

Psychology

Cognitive Psychology: Consciousness, Memory and Language

The overall aims of this module are to further explore the themes in its co-requisite Semester 1 module, Cognitive Psychology: Sensation, Perception and Memory.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Candice Condon
Assessment: 100% CA

Clinical Psychology

The aim of this module is to provide the learner with an appreciation and understanding of human behaviours that impair a person’s ability to function in daily life. One objective is to introduce the learner to personality and intelligence tests, interviews, patient observations and written case studies. This module further aims to engage the learner across historical figures, characters from the Literature, Media and Arts with disorders, as well as the philosophical ethical issues surrounding the treatment of persons with these disorders.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Ní Chuileann
Assessment: 100% CA

Research Methods in Psychology

This module will give learners an understanding of the psychological approaches utilised in community psychology research, and make them aware of the role of research in informing both theory and practice. Throughout the course, the learner will consider psychological research questions, how to conduct a literature review and the various types of research methods (experimental, correlational, etc.) and the ethical considerations employed within psychology. Learners should develop the skills and knowledge necessary to undertake a research project. They should also be capable of reading and interpreting research reports. The goal of psychological research is to better understand the social world.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Teresa Mulhern
Assessment: 50% CA & 50% Exam

Cyber Psychology

Cyberpsychology is a relatively new branch of psychology that complements the digital humanities by studying how interacting with technology shapes society and the human mind and behaviour. It is becoming an increasingly important area of study as new technology platforms are constantly emerging and becoming prevalent in our day to day lives. This module aims to introduce learners to the key concepts, theories, research methodologies and practical applications of cyberpsychology. A further aim is to introduce the learner to the eight dimensions of cyberpsychology architecture (identity, social, interactive, text, sensory, temporal, reality and physical). This is a newly developed transdisciplinary model that can be used as a framework to assess the psychological effect of virtually any digital environment and experience.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Theology and Teaching Placement

Religions, Conflict and Peace*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

The module aims to enable the learner to grasp the politics and hermeneutics involved in the interpretation of religious traditions and their correlation with issues of conflict and peace. It will develop the conceptual and practical skills needed to reinterpret the principles of secularity and religiosity to promote justice, peace and the integrity of the cosmos. It aims at assisting the learners to critique religiously supported conflicts while enabling them to transform faith for peacebuilding.

Module Co-ordinator: Stephanie Hanlon
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Trinity: A God One and Three*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

This module is intended to build upon the learners understanding of the Trinity as a central concept in Christian theology today. It will facilitate learners in exploring the Christian understanding of God as it emerges from the history of Israel and through the person of Jesus. The study will, by tracing the development of a Trinitarian doctrine, explore ways in which an understanding of the Trinity has very real consequences, not only for theology but also, life today.

Module Co-ordinator: Rev Dr Dermot Ryan
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Year 4 (60 Credits)

Semester 1

Common Module

Seminar and Dissertation

This module aims to enable the learner to develop conceptual and academic depth in research knowledge in chosen subject areas; and become competent in planning and undertaking research and in making recommendations for applying findings.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Dissertation

English, Creative Arts and Media Studies

Postmodern Literature

The module aims to chart the formal features and recurrent themes of key postmodern texts, while also outlining the varieties of postmodern writing, including: early and late postmodern fiction, postmodern feminist fiction, postmodern (metaphysical) detective fiction, and postmodern metahistorical fiction. Learners will also examine what constitutes postmodernity - that is the social, economic, technological and media developments that have characterised the postmodern age, and the effects these developments have had on how the postmodern subject experiences reality While learners will become familiar with concepts and tropes that are commonly held in postmodernist theory and culture, they will understand postmodernism as a deeply problematic and often conflicting set of concerns and attitudes.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Workman
Assessment: 100% CA

Creative Writing: Fiction

The module aims to introduce learners to different writing disciplines and styles and encourage them to experiment with them.
It will also require them to develop their skills as critics through the close reading of other writers work and their own and fellow learners writing and texts.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoghan Smith
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Portfolio

Creating Drama: From Theory to Practice 1

This module aims to introduce the principles and practice of creating for the theatre (mise-en-scène, writing or devising). Beginning with an overview of the history of the role of the director in theatre, it introduces the learner to innovators in twentieth and twenty-first century theatre from Artaud to Romeo Castelluci. It also looks at key philosophical and psychoanalytic theories as they apply to theatre. On a practical level it will introduce learners to key functions of the director (casting, blocking, interpretation, developing the production concept etc.) and finally it will give each learner the opportunity to synthesise their knowledge through a practical creative theatre project.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

Media Studies: Film 2

This module aims to give learners an informed understanding of theories within media studies and to situate the approaches to the study of film within the wider audio visual landscape.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ryan
Assessment: 100% CA

History

'The Troubles', from Conflict to Conciliation (1968-1998)

The course examines differing political viewpoints such as those of Unionists, Nationalists, Republican, Marxists, and several others. Key events during this period will be studied such as the rise of the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA), Bloody Sunday, and Anglo-Irish peace processes and agreements. It examines the conflicting political and paramilitary ideologies and activities, and the evolution towards peace which culminated in the 1998 Good Friday agreement. Joint initiatives and relationships in the pursuit of peace between Ireland, Britain and the United States will be explored and analysed.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 100% CA

Europe and the United States in the Post-War World, 1945-2000

The module examines Europe and the United States in the immediate aftermath of World War II and studies the conflicts of the Cold War from many perspectives. It analyses the emergence of European integration and concludes by considering the fall of communism and its consequences. The relationship between space, race and class across both continents will also be studied.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ida Milne /Dr Eric Derr
Assessment: 100% CA

History of Antisemitism before 1933

The Module examines the fate of an immigrant community in Europe within a monolithic society and indicates how a majority can be led to target a minority. It seeks to explain why a very small minority population within Europe was the object of hostility by the majority population over more than two millennia. It endeavours to understand the combination of circumstances which led to continuous long term hostility towards the Jews.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Mc Grath
Assessment: 100% CA

Violence, Law and Order in Modern Irish history*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

The module explores experiences of and attitudes to both violence and the law in modern Irish history. It will involve an examination of the extent, nature and characteristics of violent activity in Ireland and any changes which have occurred in patterns of violence over time. The focus will be on both interpersonal and collective violence and will offer learners an opportunity to engage with the varying causes and motives for violent activity in Irish society from the directly personal to the overtly political. The course will also focus on the role of the law and, in particular, its effectiveness in controlling violent activity in Irish society. Overall, the module will allow learners to garner a greater understanding of both the place and function of violence and the law in Irish society and among those who migrated from it, and to place the Irish experience within a broader international context.
Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Philosophy

Critical Theory 1: the Frankfurt School

This module aims to introduce learners to the history, principles, and concepts of Critical theory as developed by the Frankfurt School. It develops skills of analysis, critical reflection and the ability to formulate independent arguments through close reading of primary texts from the members of the Frankfurt School.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Humans and Other Animals 1*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

Throughout the thought of mainstream western civilisation the non-human animal has been seen as having little or no ethical significance. From ancient Greek thought through to medieval Christian theology, the idea has been reinforced that the non-human animal existed for the sake and use of the human animal. However, over the past three decades we have seen the emergence of new challenges to the traditional views of the status of the non-human animal. This first semester module is intended to investigate these new challenges in its ontological formulations based in late 20th and early 21st century continental thinking. The module will highlight the emergence of this new thinking in this tradition and the question of the animal in our time.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Philosophy and Psychoanalytic Theory 1: Psychoanalytic Theory

Since the articulation of the psychoanalytic reading of the human condition, this thinking has had a broad application in the critical thinking of other disciplines, such as Philosophy. This module is intended to equip the learner with an understanding of the development of psychoanalytic thought. This module aims to examine the major themes at work within Psychoanalytic thought through the examination of key texts.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

Philosophy, Law and Punishment

This module aims to develop learners’ capacity to apply theories, and analyse social and political institutions and phenomena in a rigorous fashion. In particular, it will present learners with the main controversies in the question of the proper relation of law to morality. It will also introduce the learners to the distinction between the concept and justifications of punishment.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Psychology

Forensic Psychology

The aim of this module is to give learners the opportunity to learn the applications of psychology to the legal system along with issues and problems that can arise. The objectives are to incorporate lectures, debates, case studies, experiments and discussion on the subject of legal processes, criminology, crime, offenders, and how punishment can fail and achieve change. This module draws on previous learning, such as cognitive psychology (memory), abnormal and clinical psychology (the abnormal personality and how to treat that), social and organisational psychology (the influence of a courtroom and how law is organised) as well as child and educational psychology (offenders tend to hail from less than privileged family and educational backgrounds).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Ní Chuileann
Assessment: 100% CA

Health Psychology

This module aims to give learners an understanding of the psychological approaches utilised in health psychology research, and make them aware of the role of research in informing both theory and practice. Health psychology is one of the most rapidly developing fields in contemporary academic psychology. The objective of health psychology is to explain the psychological issues affecting the different aspects of the self (i.e., physical, achieving, social, and private self) associated with illness. Throughout the course, the learner will consider the relationship of individual difference variables, social factors, emotional factors, cognitive factors, perceived symptoms, and factors related to access to medical care to health behaviours.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

Advanced Social Psychology

The aim of the module is to provide the learner with a more specialised and contemporary understanding of social psychology. The learner will develop the skills necessary to evaluate a piece of social psychology research and to assess the strengths and weaknesses of social psychology theories. These skills will enable the learner to evaluate contemporary research being conducted by social psychologists in the areas that will be covered in the module (i.e. cultural evolution, social self, social structures, social reasoning, limits of adaption).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Teresa Mulhern
Assessment: 100% CA

Personality Psychology

This module aims to introduce the learner to personality psychology, individual differences and intelligence. Personality psychology is a very broad area of psychological study involving the observation of the concept of personality and how it differs among people. This area of psychology looks at the overall psychological makeup of people, the psychological differences among individuals and the similarities found within human nature. In general, personality is a unique set of characteristics within a person that work to influence their beliefs, motivations, emotions, behaviours and even their environment. Learners are introduced to areas of study such as the psychoanalytic approach to personality; learning theory perspectives on personality; cognitive personality theories, humanistic personality theories and the biological basis of personality.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Teresa Mulhern
Assessment: 100% CA

Theology and Teaching Placement

Applied Christian Ethics

The aim of this module is to examine and explore key topics in applied Christian ethics. It will present learners with moral theories and case studies in order to develop further their skills of analysis and interpretation. It contributes to the Programme aims by providing learners with the opportunity to develop their skills in questioning human behaviour, ideas, and values, and to be actively-engaged citizens.

Module Co-ordinator: Michael Sherman
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Sacramental Theology: Towards a more effective Celebration

This module will trace the emergence of the sacraments as expressions of the faith community and explore our understanding of how they function. Key elements will be identified which would help in the more effective celebration of the sacraments today.

Module Co-ordinator: Rev Dr Dermot Ryan
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Catechetics and Teaching Placement 2: Post-Primary (10 ECTS Semester 1 and 2)

This module aims to build on the knowledge and experience of the pre-requisite module of Teaching Placement Primary 1. This placement prioritises learning about post primary teaching. It provides the opportunity for learners to develop their ability to plan for different class levels and to develop their ability to manage a post primary class while recognising that this is the learner’s second teaching placement. The placement combines teaching and non-teaching activities and learners will be required to maximise whole school learning opportunities which the placement provides.

Module Co-ordinator: Mary Dooley
Assessment: 100% CA

Semester 2

English, Creative Arts and Media Studies

Modern Drama in Performance

Building on the knowledge of drama and theatre that learners gained at earlier stages of the programme, the objective of this module is to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the study of a number of key works of modern drama, as well as an in-depth understanding of some of the important features and characteristics of modern dramatic performance.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Heaney
Assessment: 100% CA

Postcolonial Writing

This module has two principal aims: (1) to allow learners to read key texts from Africa, the Caribbean and South-east Asia and (2) to equip learners with critical skills and advanced knowledge and understanding of theory pertinent to postcolonial writing. Learners are encouraged to think about questions of identity, race and culture, the construction of gender in a colonial context, and the relationship between literature/cultural production and empire. A key objective of the module is to enable learners to become adept at handling key terms and concepts of postcolonial writing and theory. This is achieved by learners researching and presenting on key concepts and contributing their research to a class glossary.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Creating Drama: From Theory to Practice 2

This module furthers the themes explored in Creating Drama: From Theory to Practice 1.

Module Co-ordinator: TBC
Assessment: 100% CA

History

Irish Elections and Propaganda, 1918-1937

stable democracy in the twentieth century. This module will examine the key elections during the first few decades of independence to provide an in-depth understanding on how political parties were formed, how voting systems were created, how political parties and candidates propagandized their aims and objects, how the media influenced society and how voting patterns emerged. Contemporary writings, political speeches, propaganda campaigns and the media will be researched, along with an exploration of the historiography to analyse and interpret current understandings. Learners will engage with and question the historiography of the period and compare this to primary evidence to draw their own conclusions on early Irish politics and society.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 100% CA

Nazi Germany and the Holocaust

The course aims to examine the 'world-view' of the Nazis and to provide the learner with an in-depth introduction to the key historical, social, political and military events which resulted in the physical elimination of six million European Jews during World War Two. It will also consider the fate of other disapproved of minorities such as Roma and homosexuals in the Holocaust.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Mc Grath
Assessment: 50% CA & 50% Exam

Memory and Commemoration*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

This module will examine the processes of remembering and commemorating the past. Taking a case study orientated approach, the ways in which history and commemoration have been utilised by politicians, communities, and interest groups will be explored. This will enable learners progressing into the workplace (in, for example, museums, libraries, schools, civil buildings, media and marketing) to critically assess commemorative events, plan events, and to assess memory (its benefits and pitfalls). Given the burgeoning literature on memory over the last three decades, and the current Decade of Commemorations project a key aim of this module is to reassess the state of the field and propose and contribute to new directions in the study of memory and commemoration.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elaine Callinan
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Project

Philosophy

Critical Theory: Language and Self: from Structuralism to Post- Structuralism and Deconstruction

This module aims to introduce learners to the key thinkers, concepts and ideas associated with French critical and cultural theory in the second semester. It will investigate the significant influence this strand of critical theory has had on literary criticism. It will examine the role of language theory in relation to the increased decentring of the enlightenment humanist notion of the sovereign self, leading to post-structuralist and postmodern questionings of those assumptions of self and knowledge.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Humans and Other Animals 2*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

This module aims to provide the learner with an overview of the central concepts, different theories and modes of analysis in the area of animal ethics. It aims to develop the learner's critical and analytical skills through the reading and analysis of core texts from the animal ethics field.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Otten
Assessment: 100% CA

Philosophy and Psychoanalytic Theory II: Existential, Phenomenological and Daseinsanalytical Explorations

Since the articulation of the psychoanalytic reading of the human condition, philosophy has always sought a critical stance in relation to the key concepts that the significant thinkers of this emerging tradition articulated. This critical stance has had its negative and positive manifestations. Amongst the most positive engagements has been what can be broadly referred to as the existential-phenomenological approach. This module aims to examine the major themes at work within Psychoanalytic thought and to explore those specific philosophical engagements with these central issues through the examination of key texts.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Noel Kavanagh
Assessment: 100% CA

Psychology

Applied Criminal Psychology

The aim of this module is to give learners the opportunity to learn the applications of psychology associated with the legal system along with issues and problems that can arise when psychology is applied. The objectives are to incorporate lectures, debates, case studies, experiments and discussion to the learner on the subject of legal processes, criminology, crime, offenders, and how punishment can fail and achieve change. This module draws on previous learning therefore, such as cognitive psychology (memory), abnormal and clinical psychology (the abnormal personality and how to treat that), social and organisational psychology (the influence of a courtroom and how law is organised) as well as child and educational psychology (offenders tend to hail from less than privileged family and educational backgrounds).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Ní Chuileann
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Counselling Psychology

This module aims to introduce the learner to diverse counselling theories and to the practices derived from them in a variety of settings. The course integrates three dimensions of counselling psychology: Personality theory and theories of counselling, Lifespan development and theories of counselling, Counselling skills and practice, including ethical and professional issues. learners are introduced to diverse approaches to counselling such as gestalt counselling; person-centred counselling; behavioural/cognitive-behavioural counselling; reality therapy; family/couples counselling; applied behavioural analysis, working with various groups such as adolescents, children as well as addiction groups etc.; self-awareness and personal development.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Ní Chuileann
Assessment: 100% CA

Positive Psychology

Positive psychology is the science of human wellbeing which uses an applied approach to cultivate optimal functioning. The aim of positive psychology is to promote human flourishing through scientific research on what makes a life good. The aim of the module is to introduce learners to the core areas researched by positive psychologists. These include the cognitive, biological, emotional and social aspects of wellbeing and the key theories, concepts and definitions within these areas. Throughout the course, the learners will also examine how the findings from positive psychology can be used to improve wellbeing i.e. mindfulness, resilience and sustainable happiness across the lifespan.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Teresa Mulhern
Assessment: 100% CA

Theology and Teaching Placement

Religions, Conflict and Peace*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4

The module aims to enable the learner to grasp the politics and hermeneutics involved in the interpretation of religious traditions and their correlation with issues of conflict and peace. It will develop the conceptual and practical skills needed to reinterpret the principles of secularity and religiosity to promote justice, peace and the integrity of the cosmos. It aims at assisting the learners to critique religiously supported conflicts while enabling them to transform faith for peacebuilding.

Module Co-ordinator: Stephanie Hanlon
Assessment: 30% CA & 70% Exam

Trinity: A God One and Three*

Offered to Stages 3 and 4
This module aims to provide a critical knowledge of key concepts/themes in and around the question of God: such as, but not limited to, naming God, the problems of distinctions in God, equality and inequality in God and the implications of our understanding of these questions for the world today.

Module Co-ordinator: Rev Dr Dermot Ryan
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Trinity: A God One and Three*

Offered in 2018-19
*Cyclical with The God Question at Stages 3 and 4

This module is intended to build upon the learners understanding of the Trinity as a central concept in Christian theology today. It will facilitate learners in exploring the Christian understanding of God as it emerges from the history of Israel and through the person of Jesus. The study will, by tracing the development of a Trinitarian doctrine, explore ways in which an understanding of the Trinity has very real consequences, not only for theology but also, life today.

Module Co-ordinator: Rev Dr Dermot Ryan
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Johannine Writings

Learners will specialise in knowledge of the social and religious background of the Johannine corpus of writing. Learners will have an appreciation of the literary composition of the Fourth gospel and of the presentation of the figure of Jesus in the fourth gospel including his self presentation (ego-eimi sayings). Learners will deepen their familiarity with the personal encounters between Jesus and various individuals throughout the gospel, and the author’s dramatic presentation of the Passion, death and Resurrection of Jesus. Learners gain specialised knowledge of the Johannine letters and their purpose and concerns. And, learners will become familiar with the origins of apocalyptic writing and of the language, symbolism and message of the Book of Revelation and its enduring influence in history and literature.

Module Co-ordinator: Rev Fearghus Ó Fearghail
Assessment: 40% CA & 60% Exam

Opportunities

Graduates of the programme have gone on to find employment in a wide range of areas such as:

  • Primary and post-primary teaching
  • Marketing and advertising
  • Design
  • Media and PR
  • Human resources
  • Management
  • Creative arts
  • The civil service
  • Politics
  • Administration
  • Travel and tourism
  • Librarianship
  • Archiving
  • Information Technology
  • Pastoral care
  • Banking

*The Arts & Humanities programme at Carlow College, St Patrick’s offers a psychology stream. Taking this stream within the programme provides a foundation in psychology that offers graduates eligibility to apply for consideration for entry to a Psychological Society of Ireland (PSI) professionally accredited conversion course in psychology or further postgraduate study.

*The BA (Hons) in Arts and Humanities meets Teaching Council requirements for English, History and Religious Education. A significant proportion of graduate of the programme continue to teacher-training at primary and post-primary level, and English, History and Religious Education are key subjects on the primary and post-primary curriculum. Students on the programme who fulfil the necessary requirements can take teaching practice modules with placements at primary level and religious education at post-primary.

Graduates of the BA (Hons) in Arts and Humanities can progress to postgraduate study in the fields of English, Creative Arts, Media, Journalism, History, Philosophy, Psychology and Theology.

Stories - Graduate Profiles

596

Eva Burke

PhD Candidate and Teaching Assistant

Why Humanities?

I was interested in the mix of subjects, and I liked the idea of being able to study English while taking modules in psychology and creative writing.

 

Why did you choose Carlow College?

I was attracted to Carlow College as a close-knit college community with relatively small class numbers.

 

How would you describe your time at Carlow College?

My experience at Carlow College was wonderful. It’s such a friendly and supportive environment, and the staff (from teaching staff to librarians, admin and catering) are great. One of the significant benefits of attending a smaller third level institution is that you never feel anonymous or alone – everybody knows your name, including the lecturers, and it makes the college experience far less daunting than it might be at a bigger institution.

 

What did you enjoy most about the programme?

I enjoyed the close-knit learning environment and the diversity of subjects.

 

What did you find challenging about your programme?

I found that the work load was intense in the final year, with the thesis work in addition to essays and exams.

 

Have you worked on any exciting projects since you began working?

I have had several articles published in academic journals, and in 2018 had a book chapter published. I have also had the opportunity to take part in various conferences, both at home and abroad, and have been invited to talk about my research at public events and podcasts!

 

Why should people pursue a degree in Humanities?

A degree in humanities gives students who aren’t sure about their post-college plans great scope to make those choices when they’re ready – several of my classmates have gone on to teach at primary and second, while others are historians or pursuing postgraduate qualifications in religious studies or psychology. It provides a great breadth of learning.

 

What was the highlight of your time at Carlow College?

The highlight of my time at Carlow College was the opportunity to present my final year thesis project, as it was my first experience of sharing my research in a public space.

 

What advice would you offer to people considering to study at Carlow College?

I would advise them to consider the benefits of a 3rd level institute which offers a wide range of subject choices and a learning environment which is wonderfully supportive.

 

What did you do when you graduated?

I went straight into an MPhil programme at Trinity College Dublin, and from there to the PhD programme which I am currently enrolled in.

 

How did your experience at Carlow College help you find your first position after graduation?

I was advised to apply to my MPhil programme by the career services advisor, and my application was supported by references from Dr. Eoghan Smith and Dr. Simon Workman, who were both tremendously helpful.

 

What would a typical day look like for you?

A typical day in term time would include some library time and an hour or two of writing, plus 3-4 hours of tutorial teaching and essay marking. It might also include taking part in conferences and symposiums, and meeting with my supervisor.

What are you doing now?

 I have just finished the 2nd year of my PhD at Trinity College Dublin. I work as a TA in the English department during term time, which provides me with great experience, as I create a tutorial syllabus and work with groups of undergraduate students. I am also the recipient of an Irish Research Council postgraduate scholarship.

400

Clare Mullins

Regional Development and Project Officer, Age Action Ireland

Why Arts & Humanities?

I’ve always enjoyed variety when it comes to life and academic studies, and belonging to a close-knit community. The B.A. Honours in Humanities was very attractive to me as an undergraduate, it allowed me to explore a variety of studies such as Theology, Psychology and Philosophy, to broaden my knowledge of more than one subject, while allowing me to do so in a warm, welcoming and personal environment.

 

Why did you choose Carlow College over other institutions?

Carlow College is unlike any other college, they offer excellent courses, outstanding lecturers and it really gives the student a warm, friendly and close-knit environment to grow in. Having attended other larger universities over the years I found them lacking the personal touch. Everyone in Carlow College is treated like an individual and not just a number. I think back very fondly about my time spent there. I chose this college because I knew I would receive excellent and personal support from the academic team right through to my fellow students and all of the staff there.

 

What did you enjoy most about the programme?

I absolutely loved the variety of interesting and exciting classes on offer each year. We were some of the first students in Ireland to undertake a Philosophy course in Humans and Other Animals, I’m really proud of that and the fact that the courses really broadened my way of thinking about life. I studied English, Psychology, Drama and Performance, Social Studies and theology, It’s very hard to get such variety anywhere else. I also loved how approachable the lecturers are and how they really go above and beyond to make things fun and interesting for every student.

 

What did you find challenging about your programme?

Writing Essays was probably the thing I found most challenging. I think many students come from the Leaving Certificate where everything is there in front of you and all you have to do is learn it off. Carlow College wants you to think about things, use your thoughts and opinions and express yourself, this is something I really had no experience in until I started there. I got the hang of expressing myself and learning to write academically after a couple of months and it really has stood to me over the years in many of the jobs that I have undertaken. Plus, the college offered an excellent free service called “Essay Doctor”, where you can get help and advice about writing your essays and writing academically, which was really helpful.

 

Why should people pursue a degree in Humanities?

This is a question I get asked a lot. It’s a question I’ve really thought about. What pursuing a degree in Humanities does for you in my opinion, is it teaches you how to effectively think on your feet; express your opinions clearly and concisely, whether spoken or written; it teaches you to take large quantities of information and be able to process it quickly and effectively; it teaches you to think about ideas and theories and opens your eyes to living a better life and helping and encouraging others to do so. It also allows you to work in any industry. I have worked very successfully in the service industry, the security industry, in private and public sectors as well as the Non-Governmental Organization sectors over the years. I am able to apply myself to anything, work in fast-paced environments and make quick and effective decisions. In my experience employers nowadays are looking for candidates like this who show an ability to be able to work diversely. Personally, it has allowed me to experience many industries, seek out new and exciting career challenges and to be an asset to any industry I work in.

 

How would you describe your time at Carlow College? What are the benefits of attending a smaller third level institution?

Carlow College is really one of a kind. I found my courage, strength and personal self-belief here not to mention it has given me knowledge and life skills that have been very lucrative and attractive to my former and current employers. The courses are challenging, interesting and enjoyable. The lecturers are quirky, funny, and full of knowledge, always bringing something new and exciting to the table, and always offering an open door to you when you need the extra support. For those who enjoy the benefits of a strong student life with plenty of activities, nightlife and a student union who has always done their best to cater to students, in a warm and welcoming town, this is the place to be. Attending a smaller college means you are the focus, you get the attention you need to be the best version of yourself after 4 years, primed for the world of work, you meet amazing friends and you have support and encouragement in a friendly environment in a friendly town.

 

What was the highlight of your time at Carlow College?

There are too many highlights for me; life-long friends that I made, the academic and professional relationships that I have carried with me throughout my career, the way in which the lecturers and courses broadened my mind and understanding of myself and the world around me, the nights out with college friends, the days when we would all meet in the canteen to chat and laugh together and support each other through tough times too.  Knowing that after 4 years you never really leave, you’ve always got a place to return to where someone will remember you and your story. You don’t really get better than that.

 

What advice would you offer to people considering to study at Carlow College?

It’s not about the size of the college that matters, it’s not about what anyone else is doing or where they’re going with their lives, it’s about having an invaluable support system, with interesting, exciting and challenging courses that are going to transition you into an excellent commodity for the employer and career of your dreams; that’s what Carlow College has to offer you.

 

What did you do when you graduated?

I went to work in the security industry and was quite successful, I continued my studies in Trinity College in International Peace studies, from there I have worked in both private and public organizations, the community sector and currently as a Regional Development and Project Officer for Age Action Ireland. This coming September I will continue my studies in Psychotherapy and Counselling with the view of opening my own private practise in the near future. Life is a journey and I’m thoroughly enjoying the variety.

 

How did your experience at Carlow College help you find your first position after graduation?

The first job I entered after leaving Carlow College was in the Security Industry. It involved being able to keep detailed and coherent reports, knowledge of human behaviour, express yourself confidently in challenging situations, intake information quickly and think on your feet, my experience at Carlow College definitely helped me be all of those things.

 

What are you doing now?

I am currently working as a Regional Development and Project Officer for Age Action Ireland for the Getting Started Computer Literacy Programme. I work across 8 different counties with schools, corporates, community organizations, volunteers, students and learners to fight against digital exclusion among older people. I am involved in training, development and recruitment. It’s a very challenging and exciting role with an excellent cause.

 

What would a typical day look like for you?

When I’m not working from home, I am out and about around 8 different counties meeting people, training people, developing lines of funding or sourcing venues, planning and supervising classes and advertising the programme to various individuals and groups.

Have you worked on any exciting projects since you began working?

In my role with Carlow Older Persons Forum, Carlow Integration Forum and Carlow County Development Partnership as a project assistant, I got to work on lots of amazing projects such as the Celebration of Diversity that brings together all nationalities in the community, I’ve gotten to work on Carlow’s Age Friendly Strategy and sit on the Age Friendly Alliance which aims to make Ireland and Carlow more accessible and inclusive for all older people. I’ve also got to work on some excellent security events and train in Frontline Anti-Terrorism tactics and online systems over the years. Variety is what I love.

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